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 Post subject: Kitten lost his meow?
PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 8:16 pm 
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Bengal Kitten

Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2018 5:30 pm
Posts: 6
Hi all!
We've had Ozzy now for about a week and a half and we are loving every minute of him. He's just past 11 weeks old and is half Bengal/half Balinese. He is not too vocal - in fact, he's a pretty quiet guy! - and I would describe his meow as "small" and "light". However, three days ago his meow turned quite gravelly/raspy and at times there was no sound at all. We texted our vet a video of this and he said it is normal and not to worry. Ozzy is otherwise behaving the same - lots of energy when he's awake, and snoozing lots as kittens do. He's eating, drinking and using his litter as before. There doesn't appear to be any discharge from eyes or nose, no coughing, sneezing or fever or lethargy. He purrs a lot, especially when he's snuggled up beside one of us or having a snooze in his favourite spots. But now he has just stopped meowing altogether! Anyone have any similar experience? I don't want to overreact, but it just seems perplexing!
Thanks!
Ashley


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 4:44 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 2:21 pm
Posts: 8644
Not sure how much a vet can tell from just a video. The best thing to do is take Ozzy to the vet to be checked out. Cats do meow and if they suddenly stop -- something must be going on.

You will find this interesting. Sounds like Ozzy has a cold.

Reasons for Voice Loss

Vocal sounds are made by the physical vibration of the vocal folds. The vibrations are initiated and controlled by nervous signals from the brain through nerves to the larynx. Changes or loss of voice are caused for two reasons: mechanical interference with vocal cord vibration or lack of stimulation of the nerves to the vocal cords.

Mechanical Interference

Simply put, this is anything that physically makes it hard for the vocal cords to vibrate. Our cold virus is a good example. The swelling from infection and inflammation interferes with normal cord function and our voice changes. However, upper respiratory infections are not the major source of voice loss in dogs and cats.

Although some young animals may have voice changes with severe neonatal virus infections, this seldom happens in older animals. Mechanical interference is more likely to be caused by:

Abscesses — Foxtails eaten by dogs and sometimes cats can lodge in the tonsils, throat, and larynx and cause major swelling. Cat fight abscesses are another type of abscess that could interfere with vocal cord function. I have had patients with severe abscess in the throat caused by swelling from sewing needles and bones that got lodged in the laryngeal area.

Trauma — Severe injury, both penetrating and non-penetrating can cause swelling that interfere with vocal fold function.

Tumors and Cancer — Benign or malignant tumors can occur in and around the larynx and trachea, and can crowd and cause pressure on normal tissue and cause voice changes or loss

Neurological Interference

Decreased or non-stimulation of the nerves to the vocal cords will cause paralysis and voice changes or loss. There are many causes of neurological interference.

Tumors and cancer — Primary tumors of the nerves that control the vocal cords can cause a loss of stimulation. Non-nerve tissue tumors in the throat, neck, and chest can “pinch” laryngeal nerves and quiet the vocal cords.

Autoimmune conditions — An animal’s own white blood cells can turn on its own nerves, injure the nerve, and limit nerve impulses to the larynx and vocal cords.Muscle disorders — The vocal cords are a muscle. Autoimmune muscle disorders can block the neuromuscular junction and result in voice change or loss.

Unlike us, colds and flus are not the major reason for voice changes and loss in pets. If your dog or cat is losing their bark or meow do not put off a visit to your vet. Many of these conditions are treatable or easily managed.

With less treatable conditions, early intervention can lead to a longer, higher quality of life.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2018 8:01 pm 
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Bengal Kitten

Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2018 5:30 pm
Posts: 6
Thank you!
After a few days of monitoring closely we determined that it is an attention-seeking behavior! He started to meow again, but for my husband only (who is home all day) and when I would come and he would approach me, and his meow would be silent.
He's back to his usual meowing self now, with the occasional silent meow when he wants extra attention.
What a character! :lol:


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 1:14 am 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 2:21 pm
Posts: 8644
That is a bengal for ya! LOL


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 11:32 am 
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Asian Leopard Cat
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Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2017 6:05 am
Posts: 210
Smart as whips (whatever that means) :wink:


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 3:45 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 8:00 am
Posts: 733
Location: Ogden, UT
TraceyChops wrote:
Smart as whips (whatever that means) :wink:


Yes...sometimes.

Sometimes Dumb as Rocks. LOL

_________________
~ Kyenta


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 4:52 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 2:21 pm
Posts: 8644
Kyenta, that's just a cat who understands exactly what you say and mean but ignores you anyway! Ha ha ha.


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