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PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2015 9:20 pm 
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Bengal Cat

Joined: Wed Apr 23, 2014 12:38 am
Posts: 46
My good friend just adopted a kitten with Feline Herpesvirus. This little girl has ulcers in her eyes and her eyes are glazed over and red.
She has the kitten on different medications to help her and has taken her to the vet 2 times already. I would like to visit my friend and the kitten. My friend
said it is only contagious really from cat to cat by grooming, fighting, food bowls, litter boxes... I know I'm going to hold and love on the little kitten.
Do I need to be worried about bringing the virus into my house after the visit and worry for my cat? If so, I will not go visit. I would feel terrible though.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2015 9:28 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2010 8:08 pm
Posts: 2927
Location: West Midlands, UK
If you are worried wait til she has stopped shedding the virus ie when symptoms clear up

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2015 9:32 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2007 2:47 pm
Posts: 3809
Location: UK
ASPCA Professional wrote:
"Transmission
These diseases have an incubation period of between 2-14 days, referring to the time between exposure and the appearance of clinical signs. The pathogens are shed in various body fluids such as ocular, nasal and oral secretions and discharges. They are then spread by three mechanisms:

Mainly through direct contact of sick cats with susceptible ones
Through environmental contamination
By contact with carriers. Carriers are cats who continue to harbor and shed virus after they have been infected and recovered from clinical signs.
Aerosolization and airborne transmission of the viruses are no longer thought to be a primary means of spread of infection. They are mainly spread by fomites, which are inanimate objects. In fact, fomite transmission of disease is believed to be the most significant method of spread of any disease through a shelter. Viral particles that are found in ocular, oral and nasal secretions can contaminate clothing, hands, bedding, toys, food dishes, litter boxes, water bowls, cage floors, stethoscopes, etc.

Disease is spread when susceptible animals have contact with these contaminated objects, so isolation of sick animals alone is not a sufficient control mechanism. While neither virus lives for very long in the environment, calici can be difficult to kill. But since the viruses survive long term in the animal and not the environment, this renders environmental decontamination less critical for disease control than proper management of the population." http://www.aspcapro.org/resource/shelte ... feline-uri

Fomite spread IS possible so personally I would wait until the kitten is better before potentially exposing your cat to the virus.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2015 1:43 am 
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Bengal Cat

Joined: Wed Apr 23, 2014 12:38 am
Posts: 46
Thanks for the advice. I think I will stay away for awhile.


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