It is currently Tue Oct 24, 2017 5:09 am

All times are UTC [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 2 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Feb 28, 2010 1:54 pm 
Offline
Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:31 am
Posts: 2227
Location: UK
I have heard that there has been an outbreak of feline distemper on the continent. Has anyone else heard about this?

I think we should all be made aware of this, as it is a killer of kittens and sometimes cats too, especially those with a compromised immune system. It is quite possible/likely this could reach the UK quite soon.

It may be worthwhile checking your vaccine certificates and making sure all your cats are up to date with their vaccs for 'flu and also Panleukopenia (feline distemper/FIE).

For anyone who has, or is thinking of buying a kitten....make sure it is fully vaccinated......it could save his/her life.

A bit about Feline distemper (from Fabcats website)

Feline infectious enteritis (FIE) is also known as feline parvovirus (FPV) and feline panleukopenia (pan = all, leuko = white, penia = lack of) and is probably the greatest disease threat to any rescue facility and has a very high mortality rate, particularly in unvaccinated kittens. It was the first disease of cats to be shown to be caused by a virus. Parvoviruses are very dangerous as they are able to survive long periods, sometimes even years, in the environment. Cats infected with FPV can continue to excrete the virus for at least six weeks following infection. Parvoviruses are resistant to many disinfectants and it is vital that an effective disinfectant is used.

Source and spread of infection

Feline infectious enteritis is spread by direct faecal-oral contact and also indirectly following contamination of the environment or objects by an infected animal, eg, on food dishes, grooming equipment, bedding, floors, clothing or hands. Cats can become infected by dogs shedding parvovirus. Transplacental spread through the uterus to the unborn kittens can occur. Infection in late pregnancy leads to the underdevelopment of the cerebellum, an area of the brain concerned with coordination of movements. Kittens that are infected as they are developing in the uterus often appear normal at birth but as they become more active, they show uncoordinated movement, walking with their legs wide apart and with muscle tremors frequently present.


Clinical disease

In kittens over three or four weeks of age and adults, the virus causes a severe enteritis, following an incubation period of five to nine days. If the immune response is not adequate to protect the cat, the virus will enter the bloodstream and travel to the bonemarrow and lymph glands, leading to a marked decrease in white blood cells. From there, the virus travels to the intestines where it destroys the rapidly dividing cells of the lining of the gut. Infected cats and kittens usually have a fever, are obviously depressed and will not eat. This phase is rapidly followed by severe vomiting and bloody diarrhoea. Occasionally kittens will be found dead, having shown no signs of the disease previously.

Treatment

No specific treatment is available and it is vital that any suspected cases are nursed in isolation as this is a highly contagious disease. Protective clothing must be worn and hands washed thoroughly after handling any cat or kitten suspected of having the disease. Where possible, one or two people who do not handle any other cats should be assigned as nurses. Cats often die from dehydration and massive secondary infection, so fluids and broad spectrum antibiotics are crucial. Recombinant feline interferon omega might be helpful in the treatment of severe cases. Severely dehydrated cats will usually require intravenous fluids and veterinary support is essential. Anti-emetics (to stop vomiting) and vitamin supplements can also be helpful. Feeding the cat small meals as soon as the vomiting has resolved is also important. Good nursing care is vital to help sick cats, especially young kittens, recover from the disease.

Control

Feline infectious enteritis is far better prevented than treated. Highly effective vaccines are available and all cats and kittens should be vaccinated (including indoor-only cats). Modified live vaccines should not be used in pregnant queens or cats that are immunosuppressed and, in such cases, dead (inactivated vaccines) are recommended. As with all infectious diseases, vaccination needs to be combined with good management practices, including disinfection and use of isolation procedures. To maintain protection, regular booster vaccination will be required.


IF ANYONE HAS HEARD/HEARS ANY FURTHER INFO ON THIS WOULD THEY PLEASE POST ON HERE? IT WOULD BE USEFUL TO ALL TO KEEP THIS UPDATED IF NEEDED.
THANKS FOLKS.

_________________
Best Wishes,
Karen <UK>
http://www.suntouchedbengals.com
http://www.bengalbreedersunited.co.uk
Image
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 04, 2010 5:44 pm 
Offline
Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:31 am
Posts: 2227
Location: UK
Ok. I found out just a little more.
The problem was at a show on the continent. There were cats there that were seen to be sick and sadly went on to die soon after returning from the show, from FIE/Distemper/Parvo. How far this will have spread we do not know, but it is very important to ensure all our cats are vaccinated against FIE (Feline Infectious Enteritis), otherwise known as Distemper/Parvovirus.
This vaccine is normally included in all the 'basic' vaccinations that your kitten/cat should have had when aged 9-12 weeks, with an annual booster being maintained.

I think at this point it is important that everyone ensures their kittens AND cats are FULLY vaccinated against this. It is no good if the kitten had the first 2 vaccs as a kitten, but didn't have the annual booster which is essential in order to maintain cover for this awful, and often fatal disease.

PLEASE ensure all your kittens AND cats are up to date with their vaccinations.....a lot of lives depend upon this, should it become active in the UK. :shock:

_________________
Best Wishes,
Karen <UK>
http://www.suntouchedbengals.com
http://www.bengalbreedersunited.co.uk
Image
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 2 posts ] 

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by meemonkey