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PostPosted: Mon Aug 10, 2015 7:38 pm 
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Bengal Kitten

Joined: Mon Aug 10, 2015 7:05 pm
Posts: 13
Hi everyone, I have been a lurker for a quite a while, and recently became a catrent to a beautiful 14 week old female bengal, healthy as a horse, and a 12 week old male bengal. They are from different breeders, and I came into the female kitten first.

They have both been isolated since his arrival last week, with occasional room and toy swaps. All his vitals were normal when I took him for his first check up, urine and stool were great at home. Yesterday morning, he urinated all over my white clothes in my laundry basket, which was not a big deal until i realized it was mostly blood that he urinated. This happened rather suddenly, I did not notice anything the day or night prior. Since he sleeps in my room, isolated from Luna, the female bengal, I notice or hear if something is wrong. After I saw the blood on the clothes, I got dressed and took him to the animal hospital.

They took a sample of his urine, as I thought it would be some kind of UTI, they tested negative for any crystals or bacteria, but quite a bit of blood. They deemed it to be "unidentifiable" and an inflammation of lining of the bladder. I was prescribed Urinary SO canned food for a week and some pain killers, now he mews quite a bit when he tries to pee.

He digs through the litter box about 4 or 5 times, squatting, but most the times nothing comes out when he tries to pee. If he does pee, it can range from a couple drops, to at most 1/3 ounce. He poos perfectly normal still, eats great, but doesnt seem to be putting on much weight.

I'm truly stumped as to what this could be and how I can help him. If anyone has ever had an experience like this, any tips would help!


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 11, 2015 2:53 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 2:21 pm
Posts: 8144
Take him to a different vet! I will never settle for a vet who cannot determine what the problem may be. There is always a test for every illness and problem .... and if the vet does't mention those tests -- then he/she's not much of a vet. Your kitten is in pain when trying to urinate and you've got to fix the situation ASAP. Did they test to make sure the kidney's are functioning okay?

Your poor little baby is obviously not happy, so the sooner you get this taken care of, the happier your kitty will be. Blood in the urine is a sign of something is wrong .... they should never mix together


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 11, 2015 3:07 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Sun Feb 02, 2014 8:11 pm
Posts: 1178
It is definitely worth getting a second opinion as Sherry mentioned. There must be something more than this food and painkillers that can be prescribed to him!

Is he drinking very much? If not, you probably need to make water very attractive to him to try flush his bladder through. Do you have a pet water fountain, or does he like running taps? Mine will drink from the taps if I run them slowly for them. They do also have a fresh bowl of water though.

I'm not sure what the food is your vet prescribed. I assume it has something in it that will sooth his bladder and urinary tract and hopefully increase his thirst so he drinks more.

I hope he starts to feel better soon. Not pleasant to pass blood like that, poor little mite.

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Clare
Hendrix and Jagger, Brown Marble Boys (born 18 August 2013)
Hampshire, UK


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 11, 2015 4:16 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat
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Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2010 1:00 am
Posts: 4141
Location: Portland Oregon, USA
Yea, this really doesn't sound like something you can afford to simply wait and see about. I would probably try another vet, like others have said, and seek a definitely answer on this!

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 11, 2015 4:28 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Sun Feb 02, 2014 8:11 pm
Posts: 1178
I was just reading a site about cat food that Brian referred another OP to, and there is an interesting piece on inflammation of the bladder - definitely worth taking a look at. Sorry to nick the website reference Brian!

http://www.catinfo.org/urinarytracthealth.php#Cystitis

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Clare
Hendrix and Jagger, Brown Marble Boys (born 18 August 2013)
Hampshire, UK


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 5:30 pm 
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Bengal Kitten

Joined: Mon Aug 10, 2015 7:05 pm
Posts: 13
Thank you everyone for your recommendations! I didn't get the notification that this was posted so I am late to the party lol

He is doing great now, peeing about 2 ounces each time, compared to the half ounce before, and the colour is cleared out to a more regular musky yellow. He is getting another urinalysis done on Saturday at our vet clinic, rather than the emergency where it was originally performed.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 8:33 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2015 2:26 pm
Posts: 724
Glad to hear all seems well. My old cat, a black moggie called Harry also started peeing blood. After antibiotics did not work, the vet concluded it was inflammation of the bladder lining. Unfortunately it was bladder cancer and we lost Harry after a couple of operations did not work. Ever since then I have been slightly paranoid and use the palest colour litter I can find so even if the urine has slight blood you spot it immediately.

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Melissa

UK
Oscar - Rescue (Rascal!!!) Bengal


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2015 3:04 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 2:21 pm
Posts: 8144
Sounds to me like it was caused by stress:

""Feline lower urinary tract disorders" (commonly referred to as FLUTD, LUTD, or FUS--feline urologic syndrome) come in at least three distinct varieties. All of them put together affect less than 3% of cats, but for those who are affected, it can be a major problem. Bladder diseases occur in both male and female cats, although males have a higher risk of life-threatening blockage of the urethra. It is usually first seen in cats between 2 and 7 years of age (though some very young and very old cats may develop signs). Episodes of FLUTD are usually triggered by stress, such as home remodelling, severe weather, or loss or addition of a family member."

Happy to hear things are better.


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