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PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2014 8:12 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Sat May 03, 2008 6:52 pm
Posts: 238
Location: Scotland
Personally, I wouldn't get anymore tests done on Clyde, I put Ziggy through the mill and nearly watched him die, what for, just to get a clinical diagnose, and for the vet to right up a new article on him. I vowed never to do that again to any of my cats.

Please persuade your vet for the steroids, the reason that they don’t give them out at the start before they carry out any investigations is that the steroids mask the symptoms.

Ziggy has been steroid free for years now and he will be seven in a week’s time.

Colin x


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2014 2:08 pm 
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Bengal Kitten

Joined: Wed Feb 12, 2014 3:25 pm
Posts: 4
Poor Ziggy how very sad - it sounds like he has a very loving mummy in you and your doing all the right things.

Best of luck - Gordon


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 4:00 pm 
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Bengal Kitten

Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2017 9:53 pm
Posts: 1
I have a question. I have a 10 month old male bengal showing all the same symptoms, sudden loss of power in rear legs, constipated very low activity. He still eats and drinks blood work came back perfect and X-rays only showed his constipation. For those of you that have treat for polyneuropothy what were the doses and how long did you treat with the steroids before stopping? Any help would be greatly appreciated.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 12:43 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Sat May 03, 2008 6:52 pm
Posts: 238
Location: Scotland
Hi There,

Ziggy was on 5mg oral twice a day.

Ziggy hasn't had a relapse for a considerable time, which is great.

Just wanted to let everyone know that there is hope out there, even if at sometimes there seems to be none.

Colin


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 5:39 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 2:21 pm
Posts: 8088
Happy for an update on Ziggy. Glad things are going well.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2017 2:50 pm 
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Bengal Kitten

Joined: Thu Nov 16, 2017 2:10 pm
Posts: 2
Our 11 month old Bengal boy Satai recently fell foul of this ghastly condition. It progressed over the period of a fortnight from a reluctance to jump through to total paralysis of his back legs and tail. (His tail dragged like a chain.) He became moderately constipated, and had started to affect his front legs. It was truly awful. At the illness' nadir we feared he might not make it to his first birthday.

We noticed his altered behaviour and raised the alarm very early on (we thought it might be first signs of dysplasia) and went through several specialists before tracking down a vet neurologist (didn't even know they existed!), and whilst we were unwilling to submit the poor boy to a nerve biopsy diagnosis was able to be confirmed by way of nerve conduction tests under anaesthesia. Prednisolone was prescribed (0.8mg twice daily for a fortnight, then tapering back).

The first faint signs of improvement came 2 days later with his ability to drag himself up onto a low plinth, and 6 weeks later I'm delighted to report that Satai has made a complete recovery. He lost an awful lot of muscle tone/bulk and that's taking it's time returning but he's completely back to normal, with full leaping ability and activity levels. (whether this is entirely a GOOD thing is open to debate:) )

Will it return? we honestly don't know, and neither does the Neurologist. He considers it unlikely but there is a relative dearth of studies on this condition so we can't be sure.
Hopefully if it does we can jump on it early and nip it in the bud.
None of his siblings have experienced this: we're just lucky I guess.

Still, here is a positive outcome in what is an awful, awful illness.
Here's a shot with his Burmese brother when he was badly afflicted: they're very close, and Sal was very supportive and affectionate.
Image

And this is him now :)
Image

So this disease CAN have a happy ending:)


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2017 5:52 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 2:21 pm
Posts: 8088
Callan, thank you for sharing your experience with this. Happy things are going well now. There are specialists for cats and dogs, just like humans -- cardiologists, neurologists, ophthalmologists, etc. It is wonderful to have these great veterinarians.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 10:27 am 
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Bengal Kitten

Joined: Thu Nov 16, 2017 2:10 pm
Posts: 2
Thanks Sherry, it is wonderful indeed. The neurologist was based in a university until recently before embedding himself at a large veterinary practice. Oh, there was an error in my previous post: 0.8ml, not 0.8mg.
We would have been devastated to have lost Satai. We were cautioned about bullying behaviour with Bengals but although he is a naturally boisterous boy there not a negative bone in his body.

Callan


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