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PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2016 4:09 pm 
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Bengal Kitten

Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2016 3:51 pm
Posts: 1
I am looking into buying a Bengal cat. A local breeder said that her kittens are not considered F1 thru F5. They are far removed from the Asian Leopard cat and she only breeds domestic Bengal to Bengal. She told me that is why they are not as wild and destructive as the "F" series and they make better pets for younger children and families.

Is there any truth to this? I love the loooks of the cat, but not sure if I am ready to handle the temperment of a Bengal since I have young children and we travel often.

Thank you for you input.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2016 3:36 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2015 2:26 pm
Posts: 724
I have a rescue male bengal F9 (thanks Sherry!) I found him very challenging for the first six months. Bengals require a lot of input and attention. They need to play a lot and can be needy cats. Oscar follows me everywhere and he is my shadow. If you travel a lot then they may not be the right breed for you as they can get distressed to be apart from you. If I were you I would get a more chilled out breed, unless you have family/friends that can move into your house while you are away. F1s are far closer to the wild cat but the later F's are no calm lap cats either. Good luck with your decision

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2016 3:52 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat
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Joined: Tue Sep 23, 2014 6:38 pm
Posts: 1836
I have two rescue cats (siblings) that are not pedigree pure bengals. They could be a result of a backyard breeder, but I will never know what generation they are and only had one of them genetically tested so know that she is a bengal. They are plenty bengal acting for me. She chews wood and at times seems to run my household. She can be quite destructive and they demand most of my attention when I am at home. The one saving grace is that they both use their litter box. I don't think I would ever want an EG bengal if they are more demanding than what I have on my hands.

I am not interested in travel any longer and can't imagine leaving these two behind or trying to take them with me. They are not like regular domestic cats.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2016 4:20 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat
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Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2010 1:00 am
Posts: 4141
Location: Portland Oregon, USA
Don't get a bengal for the looks if you have reservations about behavior and temperament. Bengals are challenging cats to own no matter what their "F" number, and they are going to be higher maintenance than your average cat. Definitely worth it for those up to the challenge, but from the sound of it, you'll be happier with a more laid-back cat.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2016 4:53 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 2:21 pm
Posts: 8146
The F1 through F3 bengals are considered early generation bengals. The F4 is considered a SBT and most states allow ownership of the F4 and beyond. I would not classify bengals as "wild" but they are very high energy and require a lot of time and attention. They are very social and want the human contact. No, they DEMAND human contact. They are also very loud and vocal when they want something. They are not your ordinary cat. Many will not hop on your lap and nap, nor do they want to snuggle and be held or carried. Bengals bond extremely closely with their humans and can suffer from separation anxiety if you're gone away for any length of time (more than a day job). Many of them have a rough time during your absence and can be aloof and behave badly when you return to let you know you should not have left. Many people love the bengal for its wild look, but there is so much more to a bengal than the look. Many owners here have children, other pets and other bengals and they all seem to get along just fine! In my case, my bengal came from a bustling household that he hated into a home with two adults and no children or other pets and is doing so much better. He hates noise and heavy activity. Only you can decide if your home environment is going to be adequate for a bengal. They can be destructive and will require a lot of playtime.


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PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2016 10:55 pm 
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Senior Bengal

Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2015 9:26 pm
Posts: 59
Not sure what generation my Amara is but I guess she is beyond F5 due to me getting her for £100 without any papers but she is hardwork. I considered rehoming her when I first got her.

She seems to be naturally very territorial and my other cats really struggled at first with her living here, secondly she is very destructive but I think this is mainly boredom and her wanting to be outdoors. Also she isn't afraid to attack people. I have had her claws and teeth in me more than once and my younger brother was stroking her a few months ago for him to lift his arm up and when looked Amara was wrapped around his arm and you could see the blood before my brother got her too let go. Oddly though she loves to sleep in the bed with you, even known she is so anti-company and loves nothing more than to be under the covers purring.

I think like any breed, each cat is different and I don't think Amara's behavior is a breed trait but it is just who she is. Maybe due to bad breeding practices by the breeder who bred her? I know in Dogs if you breed an aggressive dog, you can get puppies prone to aggression hence why so many Staffy breeders have dedicated years of breeding to weaning out certain bloodlines. Which now have resulted in a calm family friendly breed.

My family have owned cats for near on 40 years from moggies to persians and we have never had a cat as difficult as Amara. She has been a working progress and only recently has she accepted us and will come to us without us having to seek her out.


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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2016 2:37 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 2:21 pm
Posts: 8146
Bengals are a breed all their own. They can be a challenge. I see that every single day with mine. I took him when he was six years old from a guy who said he was a challenge -- but I've owned cats for over 50 years and they were a piece of cake! LOL. Not a bengal!!! They are very active, very territorial, very vocal, very demanding. It's not just an F5, but mine is an F9. I spend a considerable amount of my day catering to him. It's like having a two-year old grandchild that I have to care for 24/7. He wears me out!!! Especially, after two one-hour walks every single day, rain or shine, hot or cold.


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