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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 1:53 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Sun Aug 24, 2008 10:57 pm
Posts: 752
Location: North Wales
I am so sad to hear this news. :cry:

My thoughts are with you and the family. give Millie plenty of hugs and make sure she gives them back in return.

Thinking of you all.

RIP Max x x x


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 1:55 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Wed Apr 02, 2008 3:41 pm
Posts: 2284
Location: Wroughton, Wiltshire
Lance, I'm so so sorry to hear about little Max especially after the positive news from the vet. He's at peace now and you can look back on all the special times you had with him. You did what was best for him.

Sending big hugs to you all.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 3:13 pm 
Oh no i'm so sorry :cry: I don't know what to say in these circumstances. We were so hopeful, but at least you gave him the best weeks of his life.

RIP Max

xxx


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 3:53 pm 
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Senior Bengal

Joined: Fri Aug 08, 2008 2:41 am
Posts: 51
So very very sorry. Having only had our boy for a month, I know that that is plenty of time to fall very much in love with a bewitching Bengal. I am so sorry that you've had to suffer this pain. Many many people, including me, shed a face-full of tears when they read your news. I felt like I knew Max, too.

Thank you so much for taking the time to keep us all in the loop, during Max's illness. It was amazing, considering the stress you were under.

Big hugs to your family.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 4:26 pm 
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Senior Bengal

Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2008 7:25 pm
Posts: 63
Location: South Shields (Tyne and Wear)
So sorry to hear the news, I'm sitting here in tears as if he where mine as I think most people are who have watched this post and kept up with Max's story.

Sleep well Max, you will be a star in the sky for everyone.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 4:38 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2007 1:55 pm
Posts: 8421
Location: south east england
oh lance i'm so sorry :cry:
lost for words xxx


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 4:41 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 2:14 pm
Posts: 170
Location: Leicester UK
I'm so sorry to hear that Max lost his battle :cry: He was such a cute little fella, at least he had you and Millie looking after him so well and giving him lots of love during the last 4 weeks.

Big hugs to you and Millie both.

M

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 5:23 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Fri Feb 29, 2008 9:55 pm
Posts: 315
Location: Luton Bedfordshire
Hi Lance

so sorry for you loss, I don't know what to say....

sue :(


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 7:27 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2008 5:03 pm
Posts: 1019
Location: By the sea in Lancashire
I can't thank you all enough for all your kind words and good wishes. It's been a tough old day really, and a lot of it has been spent cuddling Millie and letting her sleep in her favourite blanket, which she won't be without. Good job I was off work today!

I've spoken to the vet again and they are going to send Max to help out with FIP research. I'm really happy about that, because, like I said before, as and when a cure or vaccination comes out for FIP, I'll be able to say that Max did his bit to help. He was insured with the pet plan 6 weeks free insurance, which was handy, but I was thinking about donating the death benefit of purchase fee to FIP research too. The breeder has intimated that she would supply another kitten as and when the time was right so if I do go down that path, the death benefit will almost be a surplus amount, so on that basis, it would be good to put it to good use.

Of course, I'll still be around the board, Millie is still here so still plenty to talk about. Cat flu might be the next one, bearing in mind that's what she has according to the vet. I'm told it will take a couple of weeks for that to clear up.

Now then, how can we drag her away from this blanket???


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 7:40 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2007 1:55 pm
Posts: 8421
Location: south east england
oh bless ya, good on you for being so strong, & a small blessing that max will play his part to hopefully help others in the future.
let millie have the blanket :wink: she's probably a bit lost without max & is using it as a comforter.
big hugs to you & millie xxxx


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 7:45 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2008 3:26 pm
Posts: 954
Location: West Midlands
You've been really brave. i dont know how i would be Ive only had Solomon for 1 month and he's bedded right down in my heart. As for Millie she is one lucky kitten having a dad like you. She might feel a bit down for a few days but with all the love your giving her she will soon be off that blanket and climbing up your legs while your in the kitchen
:lol:


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 8:07 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2007 2:23 pm
Posts: 130
Location: Lancashire/n yorks
I'm so sorry. I lost a kitten to this horriable disease before i got amber. I'd only had Sadie for 3 days. I'll be keeping my fingers crossed that Millie goes from strength to strength.

wendy


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 8:12 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2008 8:17 am
Posts: 626
Location: Wiltshire
I am so so sorry, like everyone i hoped for the miracle.

our love and thoughts are with you and yours
the Clemsters, Max and Freya


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 8:25 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2007 2:54 pm
Posts: 10875
Location: Cumbria, UK
I'm so sorry to hear the news about Max - I've been away for a few days and hoped I would return to positive news.

Lance, you did everything you could for Max and I think it's great that you've made the decision to help out with future research - it's a wonderful legacy for little Max to leave behind.

Hugs to you and Millie.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 9:06 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Sun Sep 09, 2007 9:46 pm
Posts: 1499
Location: merseyside UK Earth - The Stratasphere
Here is some information for those of you who wish to understand FIP..
Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is fatal disease of cats, caused by a feline coronavirus. Infection with coronavirus is actually very common in cats but most of the time it does not cause any problems, other than maybe mild self-limiting diarrhoea. Uncommonly, the virus mutates (changes) within an infected cat, and it is this mutated form that causes the disease of FIP.

How do cats get coronavirus?
Coronavirus is ubiquitous among cats and infection with the virus is particularly common where large numbers of cats are kept together. It is estimated that 25 to 40 per cent of household pet cats are infected. This infection rate increases to 80 to 100 per cent of cats kept in multi-cat households, rescue and breeding colonies. The virus is spread by the faecal-oral route, that is, the virus is shed in faeces into the environment and cats become infected following ingestion when grooming or eating. Most infected cats shed the virus in faeces for a variable period of time and then stop. The cat can then become re-infected from another cat and start shedding virus again. In contrast, some cats shed virus continuously.

Although coronavirus is the cause of FIP, infection with coronavirus does not mean that the cat will go on to develop FIP. In comparison to the number of cats infected with the virus, the number that develop FIP is very small. It is only when the virus mutates that FIP may develop.

What causes the virus to mutate?
While the precise cause of the viral mutation is unknown, several factors are likely to play a role. The majority of cases of FIP develop in younger cats. A poorer immune response together with other stress factors such as rehoming, neutering, vaccination or other concurrent disease may make younger cats more vulnerable to FIP. FIP can, however, develop in any age of cat and predisposing factors or risk factors are not always evident. Genetics may also play a role in some cases as purebred cats appear to be at a greater risk. Sometimes particular lines of a breed have a high rate of developing FIP.

What are the clinical signs of FIP?
FIP has very diverse clinical manifestations, but there are no clinical signs associated that are unique for the disease. The classic form of the disease, often termed 'wet' FIP is characterised by a build up of yellow fluid within the abdomen (resulting in abdominal distension) and/or chest (resulting in breathing difficulties). However, the presence of this fluid is not diagnostic for FIP, and in addition a large number of FIP cases will not have any visible fluid build up. Initial clinical signs are often very vague, consisting of lethargy and loss of appetite. In some forms of the disease inflammatory lesions in the eye and nervous system can occur, resulting in visual disturbances and abnormal behaviour, a wobbly gait or tremors. The disease is usually rapidly progressive and ultimately fatal.

How can FIP be diagnosed?
There is no specific diagnostic test for FIP. Tissue biopsies can confirm a diagnosis, but often the cat is too sick for these procedures to be undertaken and so in many cases a definitive test is only made on post mortem examination.

If FIP is suspected, the veterinary surgeon will perform a thorough clinical examination, including examination of the eyes and neurological assessment. The more findings that are present that are consistent with FIP, the more likely the cat does have FIP.

If any fluid is present within either the chest, abdomen or both, analysis of this fluid is one of the most useful tests that can be performed. X-rays of the chest and abdomen, and ultrasound examination of the abdomen are very useful to detect very small amounts of fluid when obvious signs of fluid build up are lacking. This fluid can then be sampled via ultrasound guidance. The fluid is most often (but not always) thick and straw-coloured in appearance, and on analysis has a very high protein content and low cell count. The presence of fluid in the abdomen does not confirm a diagnosis of FIP as some other diseases can also lead to the build up of similar fluid. If the fluid is present within both the chest and abdominal cavity, then FIP is even more likely.

Routine blood tests (haematology and biochemistry) are very helpful firstly in trying to exclude other causes for the clinical signs, and secondly to look for changes which may support a suspicion of FIP. Frequently the numbers of one type of white blood cell (lymphocytes) are low, there may be a mild anaemia, blood protein levels are usually very high, and sometimes blood bilirubin (pigment from old red blood cells) levels are high. All these changes are very non-specific and do not make a diagnosis of FIP, but help to increase suspicion of the disease.

Many of these abnormalities may not be present in the early stages of the disease, but may become evident as the disease progresses. Thus some tests that give normal results may have to be repeated later.

Cats can be tested to see if they have been exposed to coronavirus by checking for the presence of specific antibodies. However, such a coronavirus serology test is of very limited use in diagnosing FIP. This test does not distinguish between the coronavirus encountered commonly with few associated problems, and the mutated form that causes FIP. So, as many cats are infected with coronavirus, many cats will be positive with this test. It does not give any information as to whether that cat has or may develop FIP. Furthermore, some cats with confirmed FIP are actually negative for antibodies, so it also can not be used to exclude FIP.

In cats with neurological signs without any other abnormalities, MRI scan of the brain and analysis of CSF fluid can also be useful.

Can FIP be treated?

Once clinical signs of FIP develop, it is generally an incurable and fatal disease. Treatment is given to relieve symptoms and may include anti-inflammatories and appetite stimulants. While there are a handful of anecdotal reports suggesting some success with newer antiviral drugs, studies have yet to show a proven benefit of any such treatments. In most cases euthanasia is the most humane course of action to avoid suffering.

Is there a vaccine for FIP?
There is a commercial vaccine that has been developed and is used in the USA . It is not available in the UK . The efficacy of the vaccine is really unknown with different studies producing very different results. It does not appear to be particularly effective, and is only licensed for use in kittens over 16 weeks of age, by which time most kittens are already infected with the virus anyway.

How can FIP be prevented and controlled?

Household pets
FIP is least common in household pets. The risk can be minimised by obtaining cats from a source with relatively few cats and by keeping cats in small stable groups (less than five cats in a household). Minimising ‘stress factors', such as rehoming, worming, vaccination and neutering happening all at once, or while the cat is suffering from another illness, may also help minimise the risk of the disease.

Breeding catteries with endemic FIP
Total eradication of coronavirus infection from catteries is extremely difficult as the virus is so ubiquitous, and it is unsuitable in most cattery situations to attempt this. A more practical approach is to consider elimination of coronavirus infection in newly born kittens, providing the opportunity of re-homing kittens free of coronavirus. If pregnant queens are isolated one to two weeks before they are due to kitten, and then the queen is kept isolated with her kittens (whilst employing good hygiene procedures to prevent environmental spread of infection to the kittens), a substantial number of these kittens with remain negative for coronavirus. Following weaning, the queen can be removed and the kittens still kept isolated and tested at 12 to 16 weeks of age for coronavirus antibodies. If they are negative, the isolation procedure has been successful.

This procedure sometimes fails if the queen is shedding the virus and passes it on to her kittens. It is thought that this is less likely in queens over two years of age, and can be helped by early weaning of the kittens (at five to six weeks of age when maternally derived antibodies are still protective) and removing the queen from the environment. Good hygiene is also an important part of the control of spread of the virus to kittens in these situations. Although these procedures are successful, they require considerable commitment from breeders, and there are some concerns about the behavioural development of kittens when they are reared is isolation up to the age of four months.

Often it is more appropriate to accept that there is endemic coronavirus infection and institute measures to try and minimise its impact. Considering that the virus is spread by the faecal-oral route, practical control measures that can be used include:

• Having at least one litter box for every two cats, located in easy to clean/ disinfect areas

• Litterboxes should be kept away from food and water bowls to prevent cross contamination

• Faeces should be removed from litterboxes at least once daily, and litter should be completely changed as often as possible accompanied by disinfection of the trays

• Cats should be kept in small stable groups of four or less – minimising cross-contamination within a household

• Breeding programmes with more than eight to 10 cats (including kittens) should not be undertaken in a normal household. Larger numbers require some purpose built facilities to enable proper hygiene and care to be maintained.

• Regular brushing of the coat, particularly of long-hair cats is desirable to reduce contamination with faeces and litter

• Isolation of queens and their kittens can be recommended as a means to controlling spread of coronavirus to the kittens.

Rescue catteries
Adequate hygiene and avoiding overcrowding are essential strategies for minimising the risk of FIP in such situations. Cats should be housed individually, or if this is not possible, they should be batched on arrival, and kept in small stable groups.

Updated November 2005


This information sheet is produced by the Feline Advisory Bureau


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