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PostPosted: Sat Dec 14, 2013 6:54 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Sun Aug 11, 2013 6:09 pm
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I've read a lot about the introduction process and we're doing this properly however it's scaring me to hell.
Lily obviously smelled the other bengal, who is also a female. She began hissing and growling (something I've never seen her do before) and getting all territorial. I expected this. What I did not expect was her to hiss and growl at me when I went to fuss her afterwards.

It really hurt to be honest, as stupid as that sounds.
I'm now pretty scared she hates me. She won't come near me and will play but barely. Is this normal behaviour when introducing a new bengal?

Anything else I can do here?
The new bengal is called Orchid and is a little older than Lily.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 14, 2013 7:10 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

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I would say this is normal behavior for all cats in general. A friend of mine has 3 domestics (2 female and 1 male) and a couple weeks ago we found a 1 year old female outside crying in the corner of his apartment building and shivering from being so cold... brought her in and immediately his male started acting exactly the way your saying your female is.

I wouldn't say the cats were mad at their owners, just that cats are territorial by nature... so any new animals on their turf will be met with hostility. I wouldn't let it bother you in all honesty, as it's not being directed towards you on purpose... she is just pissed off that some unknown cat is is around. Introductions of new cats are process and will take time to get them use to each other.

I watched this multi-part video on youtube that seemed really informative with regards to introductions:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_mgXHAMDZI


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 14, 2013 7:37 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

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MortTheBeast wrote:
I would say this is normal behavior for all cats in general. A friend of mine has 3 domestics (2 female and 1 male) and a couple weeks ago we found a 1 year old female outside crying in the corner of his apartment building and shivering from being so cold... brought her in and immediately his male started acting exactly the way your saying your female is.

I wouldn't say the cats were mad at their owners, just that cats are territorial by nature... so any new animals on their turf will be met with hostility. I wouldn't let it bother you in all honesty, as it's not being directed towards you on purpose... she is just pissed off that some unknown cat is is around. Introductions of new cats are process and will take time to get them use to each other.

I watched this multi-part video on youtube that seemed really informative with regards to introductions:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_mgXHAMDZI



Hi - thank you.
Are they okay with the cat now?
Lily keeps making deep growling sounds and patrolling the room. She let me pick her up and stroke her and just laid on my lap which is unusual.
I've researched it all thoroughly. We want to eventually get a large maine coon and possibly an exotic so this isn't the last time this could potentially happen. It's all a bit... overwhelming? I guess I'm a little under experienced and have so much love for Lily that the thought of the bond not being there hurts a little.


What do we do if they fight for dominance?
Should we continue life as normal and go about our business leaving them in the rooms they've been designated?


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 15, 2013 12:55 am 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 11:03 pm
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It is typical that she is mad at you/mad that you smell like a stranger cat. It will get better but she may get mad on and off after you go visit the cat. Start doing a scent exchange if you know the new cat is free and clear of parasites and critters. I have found it is best to wait until aggression passes before doing any face to face introductions. It always goes much smoother that way.

If the any full out cat fights, you are robably introducing them too soon. There will be some some growls, hisses, and swatting, but any fighting should really break up quickly. The less fighting they do, the sooner they trust each other, and the sooner they will be friends. Time is the only way to mediate that. You also need to develop a relationship with the new cat before you introduce the two.

The first new cat tends to be the roughest, in my experience at least. Good luck!

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 16, 2013 5:59 am 
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Asian Leopard Cat
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TigerLily wrote:
Hi - thank you.
Are they okay with the cat now?
Lily keeps making deep growling sounds and patrolling the room. She let me pick her up and stroke her and just laid on my lap which is unusual.
I've researched it all thoroughly. We want to eventually get a large maine coon and possibly an exotic so this isn't the last time this could potentially happen. It's all a bit... overwhelming? I guess I'm a little under experienced and have so much love for Lily that the thought of the bond not being there hurts a little.

What do we do if they fight for dominance?
Should we continue life as normal and go about our business leaving them in the rooms they've been designated?


When you add a cat to a home with resident cat(s) you are doing something that is likely to deeply upset the resident cat(s). You have to realize that and own up to it. The fact that the resident cat(s) get upset with you is a completely predictable and appropriate response on their part, expressing the betrayal that they feel. In such cases, you definitely have some fences to mend with that resident cat who used to be your best friend.

Now, it could work out that the two cats become good friends, and it makes it all worth it, or they could become merely accepting with one another, but not friends, or they could become bitter rivals for life. It depends on your ability to integrate them and the personalities of the cats involved. Each time you do it, it becomes harder and harder, as more personalities get involved, and there is less of you, and other resources like the best places to sleep etc., available. You could have one or two or three perfectly happy cats, and add another, and then suddenly have all the cats upset and peeing and pooing outside their litter boxes, fighting and hurting each other etc. So adding a cat is a big deal, and you need to be prepared for this kind of thing and think very carefully about why you're doing it, and how you are going to handle these kinds of problems if and when they arise.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 16, 2013 11:56 pm 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 2:21 pm
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Somebody is not happy with the new arrangement. A new kitty, new smells. Basically, this upsets the other kitty. Introducing two cats takes time and patience. It's not that they may never be friends ... it's that it will take a long while for them to get along with each other. As for your kitty being upset with you ... it should pass with time.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 1:52 am 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2007 2:47 pm
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Location: UK
TigerLily wrote:
I've researched it all thoroughly. We want to eventually get a large maine coon and possibly an exotic so this isn't the last time this could potentially happen. It's all a bit... overwhelming? I guess I'm a little under experienced and have so much love for Lily that the thought of the bond not being there hurts a little.


What sort of research would tell you that two Bengals, a Mainecoon and an Exotic would be a good mix?
I think that is probably asking for trouble IMO, unless you have a huge house and enough territory for them all to spread out without causing continuous territorial disputes.

Too many people want one of those, one of those and one of those and two of those, and before they know it they have a multicat household, which often ends up with cats being rehomed. Often that can be the Bengals, because their tolerance for other cats is probably lower than most other cats, and because a Bengal in all out fight mode is a scary sight.
Peeing, spraying, pooing, fighting and bullying are common in multicat households, once all the cats grow out of the huggy, cuddly "I love everyone" kitten phase.
If these cats are left alone, without gaining extra "one too many" intruders into their home territory, then they will have a very nice life.
As it is, many impose constant new additions and end up with overcrowded spaces and many cat "issues".
It then turns out the cats lead unhappy lives constantly stressed or are put "on medication" to "solve" their unsociable traits, or end up at war with their housemate(s), or are unceremoniously dumped or even put down "for their own good" as they do not get on with other cats, or are continually messing in the house... :rolleyes:

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