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PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 9:21 pm 
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7Deadly$ins wrote:
minx wrote:
I'm apologising in advance but I can't help myself! :mrgreen: I went to see it today at The Globe on the Embankment in London...."Hamlet" - what a play!

"To be or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep; perchance to dream; ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil....."

Ah, no fair! Seeing a play at The Globe is sort of on my Bucket List. I haven't decided which one, yet. I don't exactly live in London so I sort of have to choose carefully. :3 I'm sure Hamlet was fantastic!


Oh....you have to see Hamlet! Its his longest play so on that basis you'll get your money's worth otherwise it is impossible to choose! Lurve Shakespeare (which is why one of my boys is named after him)....such an evocative playwright, people watcher and founder of much of our language! Pure genius! If you do get to go...get a ticket in the stalls and not the yard. The yard is open to the elements (such as the rain we had today) and you have to stand for 2.5 hours, no umbrellas allowed! For the stalls - get a cushion - the seats are wooden benches and there isn't much legroom (we Brits were a lot smaller back then). The exhibition is worth paying for and allow the whole day...it covers Shakespeare (including his will and first folio) but also alot about Elizabethan London which was extremely interesting. There were also artifacts uncovered from the dig at the site of the original playhouse, costumes, information about the makeup worn at the time (which was rather scarey) and how they carried out their "special effects" such as hangings on stage. I also visited the shop before leaving and purchased one of their "folios" - they have facsimile copies of the "first folio" and have bound each play into an attractive book. Chuffed to bits! :mrgreen:

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 11:21 pm 
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minx wrote:
I'm apologising in advance but I can't help myself! :mrgreen: I went to see it today at The Globe on the Embankment in London...."Hamlet" - what a play!

"To be or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep; perchance to dream; ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil....."

I went to see it twice when I was doing it at school, can't remember if it was O level or A level. Didn't go to the Globe :( one was somewhere in Manchester I think. Hamlet was played by Robert Lyndsay which I thought was hilarious at the time cos the only thing I'd seen him in was "Citizen Smith" also they were in modern clothes which to me made it a bit confusing but I thought it was brilliant. The other time can't remember where it was but it was the 1948 film version with Sir Laurence Olivier. Anytime anyone ever mentioned Hamlet to my dad he used to go through that full soliloquy lol

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 11:43 pm 
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Parrissnpo wrote:
minx wrote:
I'm apologising in advance but I can't help myself! :mrgreen: I went to see it today at The Globe on the Embankment in London...."Hamlet" - what a play!

"To be or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep; perchance to dream; ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil....."

I went to see it twice when I was doing it at school, can't remember if it was O level or A level. Didn't go to the Globe :( one was somewhere in Manchester I think. Hamlet was played by Robert Lyndsay which I thought was hilarious at the time cos the only thing I'd seen him in was "Citizen Smith" also they were in modern clothes which to me made it a bit confusing but I thought it was brilliant. The other time can't remember where it was but it was the 1948 film version with Sir Laurence Olivier. Anytime anyone ever mentioned Hamlet to my dad he used to go through that full soliloquy lol


8) I didn't know Sir Laurence Olivier did one so I'm going to have to find that now as I always admired his work (my fav is "Rebecca"). Robert Lindsay....yes, that would have me giggling too as I remember him from "My Family". Interesting connection...in that sitcom his wife is played by Zoe Wannamaker whose father Sam Wannamaker was the person who instigated the rebuild of The Globe! Yes, it was weird as the one I saw they had them all in 1950s clothing! That said, have you seen the Kenneth Brannagh film version? Stunning film with full great cast and filmed at Blenheim Palace with the kind permission of the current Duke. Have to say...quite fancy Kenneth now as he was very moving! :oops: :lol: I think that one is set in the early 1900s (I think) but as he explains, this was quite often the custom in Elizabethan times to put the plays on in different time periods. No idea how they know this! But I agree, it is confusing and just seemed wrong to me when I saw Queen Gertrude with her 1950s stockings with the lines up the back and that hair...I kept thinking I'd like to try my hair like that which isn't really what you're supposed to be concentrating on is it! That soliloquoy....funny that about your Dad! :lol: People can't resist though...I'm pants as my memory is terrible so I can only remember the first four lines! What gets me is people say "Alas poor Yorick! I knew him well"....when the line is actually "Alas poor Yorick! I knew him Horatio." Always makes me giggle that! But the best thing about that is that people know the line (or most of it) even if they haven't seen or read it. :)

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2012 12:10 am 
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Fenstar wrote:
I just got The Spinoza Problem by Irvin Yalom in the mail last night, so will add that to my list. Irvin Yalom is my counselling/psychology hero, I hoover up everything he writes. Can't wait to get into this.

When sixteen-year-old Alfred Rosenberg is called into his headmaster’s office for anti-Semitic remarks he made during a school speech, he is forced, as punishment, to memorize passages about Spinoza from the autobiography of the German poet Goethe. Rosenberg is stunned to discover that Goethe, his idol, was a great admirer of the Jewish seventeenth-century philosopher Baruch Spinoza. Long after graduation, Rosenberg remains haunted by this “Spinoza problem”: how could the German genius Goethe have been inspired by a member of a race Rosenberg considers so inferior to his own, a race he was determined to destroy?

Spinoza himself was no stranger to punishment during his lifetime. Because of his unorthodox religious views, he was excommunicated from the Amsterdam Jewish community in 1656, at the age of twenty-four, and banished from the only world he had ever known. Though his life was short and he lived without means in great isolation, he nonetheless produced works that changed the course of history.

Over the years, Rosenberg rose through the ranks to become an outspoken Nazi ideologue, a faithful servant of Hitler, and the main author of racial policy for the Third Reich. Still, his Spinoza obsession lingered. By imagining the unexpected intersection of Spinoza’s life with Rosenberg’s, internationally bestselling novelist Irvin D. Yalom explores the mindsets of two men separated by 300 years. Using his skills as a psychiatrist, he explores the inner lives of Spinoza, the saintly secular philosopher, and of Rosenberg, the godless mass murderer.


I can't believe I missed this....this sounds a fascinating comparison! Has it arrived yet and how are you finding it?? I'm a fan of Philip Zimbardo....have you read "The Lucifer Effect - How Good People Turn Evil"?? Fascinating stuff and you can see part of his presentation on Youtube...word of warning for others....this is disturbing stuff (yet utterly fascinating)...this book examines his classic Stanford Prison Experiment and he considers the findings in line with the Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo Bay prisons (on which the U.S. government called him in as an expert to explain what happened there) and raises fundamental questions about the nature of good and evil and how and why most of us could be initiated into the ranks of evil doers....utterly absorbing (BUT disturbing....so if you're going to youtube watch any of this stuff on him, only do so if you are not easily shocked or disturbed - you have been warned!)

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2012 11:30 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 4:04 am
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minx wrote:
Parrissnpo wrote:
minx wrote:
I'm apologising in advance but I can't help myself! :mrgreen: I went to see it today at The Globe on the Embankment in London...."Hamlet" - what a play!

"To be or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep; perchance to dream; ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil....."

I went to see it twice when I was doing it at school, can't remember if it was O level or A level. Didn't go to the Globe :( one was somewhere in Manchester I think. Hamlet was played by Robert Lyndsay which I thought was hilarious at the time cos the only thing I'd seen him in was "Citizen Smith" also they were in modern clothes which to me made it a bit confusing but I thought it was brilliant. The other time can't remember where it was but it was the 1948 film version with Sir Laurence Olivier. Anytime anyone ever mentioned Hamlet to my dad he used to go through that full soliloquy lol


8) I didn't know Sir Laurence Olivier did one so I'm going to have to find that now as I always admired his work (my fav is "Rebecca"). Robert Lindsay....yes, that would have me giggling too as I remember him from "My Family". Interesting connection...in that sitcom his wife is played by Zoe Wannamaker whose father Sam Wannamaker was the person who instigated the rebuild of The Globe! Yes, it was weird as the one I saw they had them all in 1950s clothing! That said, have you seen the Kenneth Brannagh film version? Stunning film with full great cast and filmed at Blenheim Palace with the kind permission of the current Duke. Have to say...quite fancy Kenneth now as he was very moving! :oops: :lol: I think that one is set in the early 1900s (I think) but as he explains, this was quite often the custom in Elizabethan times to put the plays on in different time periods. No idea how they know this! But I agree, it is confusing and just seemed wrong to me when I saw Queen Gertrude with her 1950s stockings with the lines up the back and that hair...I kept thinking I'd like to try my hair like that which isn't really what you're supposed to be concentrating on is it! That soliloquoy....funny that about your Dad! :lol: People can't resist though...I'm pants as my memory is terrible so I can only remember the first four lines! What gets me is people say "Alas poor Yorick! I knew him well"....when the line is actually "Alas poor Yorick! I knew him Horatio." Always makes me giggle that! But the best thing about that is that people know the line (or most of it) even if they haven't seen or read it. :)

This line mistake bothers me, too. xD Not as much as when people say "Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?" and start physically "looking around" as if searching for Romeo, though. Thank you for the advice about the Globe... I know about box seats/cushions and all (Shakespeare professor liked to get a little sidetracked) but there was a lot of information there I didn't know. I would LOVE to have a reproduction of the first folio. That sounds absolutely fantastic. I'll make it there one day! My father travels a lot and it's always been something of a family goal to make it to London (ancestor heritage and all). Dad makes it over there all the time... one day I'll succeed in tagging along. ;) Failing that I'll just go myself once I'm out of Uni. xD

The Kenneth Branaugh Hamlet is a quite good reproduction... I think it might be one of the only (only?) modern movie version that contains the entirety of Hamlet. It IS such a long play, after all.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2012 12:00 am 
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Asian Leopard Cat

Joined: Thu Aug 02, 2012 10:10 pm
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7Deadly$ins wrote:
I went to see it twice when I was doing it at school, can't remember if it was O level or A level. Didn't go to the Globe :( one was somewhere in Manchester I think. Hamlet was played by Robert Lyndsay which I thought was hilarious at the time cos the only thing I'd seen him in was "Citizen Smith" also they were in modern clothes which to me made it a bit confusing but I thought it was brilliant. The other time can't remember where it was but it was the 1948 film version with Sir Laurence Olivier. Anytime anyone ever mentioned Hamlet to my dad he used to go through that full soliloquy lol


8) I didn't know Sir Laurence Olivier did one so I'm going to have to find that now as I always admired his work (my fav is "Rebecca"). Robert Lindsay....yes, that would have me giggling too as I remember him from "My Family". Interesting connection...in that sitcom his wife is played by Zoe Wannamaker whose father Sam Wannamaker was the person who instigated the rebuild of The Globe! Yes, it was weird as the one I saw they had them all in 1950s clothing! That said, have you seen the Kenneth Brannagh film version? Stunning film with full great cast and filmed at Blenheim Palace with the kind permission of the current Duke. Have to say...quite fancy Kenneth now as he was very moving! :oops: :lol: I think that one is set in the early 1900s (I think) but as he explains, this was quite often the custom in Elizabethan times to put the plays on in different time periods. No idea how they know this! But I agree, it is confusing and just seemed wrong to me when I saw Queen Gertrude with her 1950s stockings with the lines up the back and that hair...I kept thinking I'd like to try my hair like that which isn't really what you're supposed to be concentrating on is it! That soliloquoy....funny that about your Dad! :lol: People can't resist though...I'm pants as my memory is terrible so I can only remember the first four lines! What gets me is people say "Alas poor Yorick! I knew him well"....when the line is actually "Alas poor Yorick! I knew him Horatio." Always makes me giggle that! But the best thing about that is that people know the line (or most of it) even if they haven't seen or read it. :)[/quote]
This line mistake bothers me, too. xD Not as much as when people say "Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?" and start physically "looking around" as if searching for Romeo, though. Thank you for the advice about the Globe... I know about box seats/cushions and all (Shakespeare professor liked to get a little sidetracked) but there was a lot of information there I didn't know. I would LOVE to have a reproduction of the first folio. That sounds absolutely fantastic. I'll make it there one day! My father travels a lot and it's always been something of a family goal to make it to London (ancestor heritage and all). Dad makes it over there all the time... one day I'll succeed in tagging along. ;) Failing that I'll just go myself once I'm out of Uni. xD

The Kenneth Branaugh Hamlet is a quite good reproduction... I think it might be one of the only (only?) modern movie version that contains the entirety of Hamlet. It IS such a long play, after all.[/quote]

I don't know if they do international shipping because when I go on it recognises me only - but the website is http://www.shakespearesglobe.com and you need to be looking for "The Globe Folios" in the shop on page 5. So go and have a look, you may be able to purchase. : D So you're at Uni - what's your "major"? Is that what they call it over there??? I'm at Kings in London. The Kenneth Brannagh film...I'm not sure but I think you may be right in that it is the only full length version. Agreed...a mammoth play! Well, if you do make it over here, look me up, happy to give a tour of London (or our student bars) if I'm not knee deep in work!!!

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2012 12:22 am 
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Yes, major is the right term. Currently I'm undeclared but I'm 95% certain that I'll declare into Communication Studies with a minor in Japanese. I'd love to major in English or Lit but the career prospects are a little more limited.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2012 12:31 am 
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Well, I suppose with Japanese that should open up your prospects significantly should you wish to work there. What does "Communication Studies" cover then as I am intrigued? Not even sure we have that as an actual degree here. Out of curiosity, why do you think that English or Lit is limiting? :)

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2012 12:36 am 
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Well, at least around here many of my academic advisers have been telling me that unless I want to teach that English by itself might not be a great pick for me. It's a little stupid, because Communication Studies is really not thaaaaat different, but I can only stray so far from my roots. Just about all the majors I'm interested in are in this general area, so... Communication is a little broader, though, in that more people accept it for a wider variety of positions including many of the English possibilities (publication editors and so on) but also there are concentrations involving advertising or marketing or international relations and so on. It's a really broad major with a lot of stuff under it, so in the end it depends on what classes I take and internships and so on. My current Communications class has a focus on Popular Culture and the way it is created/controlled and marketed.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2012 12:57 am 
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That is interesting! I'm surprised that your teachers are telling you that, but that's just my opinion! Its just that, it is usually the reaction of most people not in that field (assuming you can only be a teacher). But then if you're looking to keep your options open (does depend on your age, career aspirations and previous work experience etc) that it is general enough that you can choose pretty much any profession route. If you are interested in marketing or advertisting, publication editor and so on then I wouldn't agree that you have broader options (other than with the language)....English is after all considered a pure academic subject. Anyhow, who knows?! At the end of the day it is just a starting point and it is usually life experience and personality that gets you the job in most cases (in my experience) not just qualifications. How long do you have to go? The very best of luck with it anyway. :)

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:10 am 
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Yes, I'm getting a lot of conflicting opinions from my advisers and in general I've been sort of left with the idea that what I major in doesn't really seem to matter all that much, since my options are all sort of along the same lines. I have time left to iron it out because I'm only a sophomore, and I might end up doing a fifth year or a year abroad, so we'll see.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:16 am 
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7Deadly$ins wrote:
Yes, I'm getting a lot of conflicting opinions from my advisers and in general I've been sort of left with the idea that what I major in doesn't really seem to matter all that much, since my options are all sort of along the same lines. I have time left to iron it out because I'm only a sophomore, and I might end up doing a fifth year or a year abroad, so we'll see.


What's a sophomore?? Apologies but we have different terminology here. :)

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:27 am 
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minx wrote:
7Deadly$ins wrote:
Yes, I'm getting a lot of conflicting opinions from my advisers and in general I've been sort of left with the idea that what I major in doesn't really seem to matter all that much, since my options are all sort of along the same lines. I have time left to iron it out because I'm only a sophomore, and I might end up doing a fifth year or a year abroad, so we'll see.


What's a sophomore?? Apologies but we have different terminology here. :)

Oh, sorry! I remember I learned just the other day that Sophomore doesn't have this meaning across the pond but it looks like I forgot it. I'm in my second year of university. ;)


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:37 am 
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No apology needed - you've just taught me something that I didn't know! IMO you've probably got the right attitude to it all....I've found that teachers are wonderful in their chosen profession but have no idea really of how it works outside the academic institution (bit of a bold statement there so apologies to any teachers lurking on here! We're all entitled to an opinion!) That said, they are wonderful people who know their field (generally), have elephant memories and usually are very interesting to be around. But at the end of the day (again IMHO) degrees are either the starting point to your career or if you are older they act as an enhancement.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2012 11:23 pm 
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How's everyone getting on with their book?


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